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Simple Winter Tree Activities for Kids
December 17, 2015

Autumn is the showy time for many trees, when kids, teachers, and parents talk about and collect their bright leaves. But what about winter?

You can keep the tree conversation going through the colder season by making observations on walks and other outings. Follow your budding naturalist’s lead when you can, but bring a few ideas to jumpstart exploration if his or her attention wanders.

Here are some simple activities you might try:

  • Move the focus off of leaves and onto trunks. Try putting your arms around trees (or your hands around saplings). Which are biggest around? Smallest? Tallest? Shortest? Smoothest? Roughest? Are they all the same color? Which have low branches?
  • Gather fallen needles or pinecones to bring home and compare to those pictured in a field guide. Or bring your guide out with you. Try rolling the needles in your fingers to identify whether they are flat and soft—“flat, friendly fir”—or round and prickly—“sharp, spiny spruce.”
  • Sit under a tree in silence for a minute, and use all your senses to observe what happens. Then draw or write about what you noticed. (It’s best to sit on a sleeping pad or other ground cover if there’s snow.)
  • Make bark rubbings using paper and crayons. Use the full length of the crayon’s side, taking the wrapper off. Thick crayons, thin paper, and rough-barked trees are great for this activity.
  • Read about trees, in books like Winter Trees by Carole Gerber, in which a young boy identifies seven trees in a snow-covered forest by observing branches, shapes, and bark.
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COMMENTS

By: Guest
Posted: 09/06/2018 06:46

These are absolutely amazing ides ever. I think people are quite similar with is. Everyone does some winter tree activities as it is a very stress relief method. Nice to read the methods here and share more with us. 

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By: Guest
Posted: 09/01/2018 03:56

During autumn time, there are lots of activities assigned by the teachers to the students like collecting the bright leaves of trees. But when we think about winter tree activities, it is totally confusing. This article helps us to understand an idea about some of the winter tree activities. home survival kit

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By: Guest
Posted: 07/02/2018 07:47
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With winter season to soon follow, the terrains will be covered in snow and will be a great time to take a stroll in the lawn and make some snowman or use a slide. Snow sports will be pretty great during this time of the year. Trinity Builders Reviews

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By: Guest
Posted: 06/07/2018 06:22

I had organized such activities for children last year and We started the activity by reading the book and taking a close look at the trees mentioned in the book. Then I pulled out rubbing plates for various leaves. Roylco's Rubbing Plates are perfect because they are a great size for children and come with a leaf identification guide. spybot search and destroy

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By: Guest
Posted: 04/04/2018 07:26
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During Autumn time there are lots of fun activities with trees by the children. Similar way we need to play lots of activities during the winter time too. Good to know that you have mentioned each of those activities one by one here. Keep up the good work.aba therapy services

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By: Guest
Posted: 05/30/2017 06:35

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